Posts tagged “Leading teams”

Virtually every organisation has a list of behaviours that are considered to be “gross misconduct”. 
 
Gross misconduct is something considered so serious that it strikes at the heart of the contract of employment, and effectively tears it up. So serious that an employee can be dismissed, without warning or notice, even for a first offence. 
 
So here’s a question for you. 
1. Know your purpose (and make sure the team know it too!) 
Why, exactly, does your team exist? What value do they add to the business, or if you prefer, what would happen if the team didn’t exist? We underestimate people’s need to find purpose in their work. Studies repeatedly show that those who have a clear sense of purpose are more engaged, less stressed, stay longer in their roles, and work more productively than their colleagues. So make sure your team understand why they matter to the business, and how they make your business better just by being there. 
Managers often ask me what the secret is to improving employee performance. Usually, I imagine, in the hope that there is something about the employee that can be "fixed". Sometimes those managers are surprised to find out that the answer may be a bit closer to home! Here are 5 mistakes people managers regularly make, that can have a serious impact on employee motivation and performance. 
What is the one thing you have in common with every single person you work with, every customer or potential client you come into contact with, every supplier you deal with, and every competitor in your market place? In fact, with every other person on this planet? 
How many hours have you spent in unproductive meetings this week? 
 
A YouGov poll in 2015 suggested that 49% of UK employees waste time in meetings every week, with distracted employees, waffling, lack of agenda and failing to reach decisions being particular bugbears. Here are a few of our top tips for more effective meetings. 
What makes the difference between a workplace you want to stay in, and a workplace you can’t wait to leave? 
 
You might think that money and perks can make a bad job bearable, but most motivation theories tell us that financial benefits are only a short-term motivator. 
“We’ve tried to implement change, but some individuals won’t accept their new responsibilities.” 
 
Does this sound familiar? A typical scenario involves a new management structure, new roles, and some key responsibilities that should have been devolved to more junior employees but remain stubbornly “stuck” with their managers. As a result, managers struggle to cope with their workloads, while staff are underemployed and not actually performing the full scope of the jobs they are employed to do. 
Last week I watched Nick Leeson give the keynote speech at Nottingham Business Expo 2015. You may remember the so-called “Rogue Trader” who brought down Barings Bank 20 years ago, by hiding the losses he was making from his bosses. 
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